ALFARABI, AVICENNA, AND AVERROES ON INTELLECT: THEIR COSMOLOGIES, THEORIES OF THE ACTIVE INTELLECT, AND THEORIES OF HUMAN INTELLECT

ALFARABI AVICENNA AND AVERROES ON INTELLECT
  • Book Title:
 Alfarabi Avicenna And Averroes On Intellect Their Cosmologies Theories Of The Active Intellect And Theories Of Human Intellect
  • Book Author:
al-FarabAvicennaHerbert A. Davidsonibn rushd (Averroes)
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374
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ALFARABI AVICENNA AND AVERROES ON INTELLECT – Book Sample

Contents – Alfarabi Avicenna and Averroes On Intellect

2. Greek and Arabic Antecedents, 7

  • Stages of Human Intellect, 9
  • The Kind of Entity That the Active Intellect Is, 13
  • The Active Intellect as a Cause of Human Thought, 18
  • The Active Intellect as a Cause of Existence, 29
  • Conjunction with the Active Intellect; Immortality, 34

3. Alfarabi on Emanation, the Active Intellect, and Human Intellect, 44

  • Al-Madina al-Fd4ila and al-Siyasa al-Madaniyya, 44
  • Alfarabi’s Philosophy of Aristotle, 63
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  • Alfarabi’s Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, 70
  • Concluding Note, 73

4. Avicenna on Emanation, the Active Intellect, and Human Intellect, 74

  • The Emanation of the Universe; the Active Intellect
  • as a Cause of the Existence of the Sublunar World, 74
  • Stages of Human Intellect; the Active Intellect
  • as the Cause of Human Thought, 83
  • Imagination, Cogitation, Insight, 95
  • Conjunction and Immortality, 103
  • Prophecy, 116
  • Summary, 124

5. Reverberations of the Theories of Alfarabi and Avicenna, 127

  • Avicenna’s Islamic Successors, 127
  • Reverberations in Medieval Jewish Philosophy, 180
  • Contents
  • Reverberations in Scholastic Philosophy, 209
  • Summary, 218

6. Averroes on Emanation and on the Active Intellect as a Cause of Existence, 220

  • General Considerations, 220
  • The Emanation of the Universe, 223
  • The Active Intellect as a Cause of Existence: Epitomes of the
  • Parva naturalia and the Metaphysics, 232
  • The Active Intellect as a Cause of Existence:
  • The Commentary on De generatione animalium, 242
  • The Active Intellect as a Cause of Existence:
  • The Long Commentary on the Metaphysics and Tahdfut al-Tahdfut
  • (Destructio destructionum), 245
  • Summary, 254

7. Averroes on the Material Intellect, 258 – Alfarabi Avicenna and Averroes On Intellect

  • Introduction, 258
  • The Epitome of the De anima and the Epistle on the
  • Possibility of Conjunction, 265
  • A Minor Composition on Conjunction and the Middle Commentary on the De anima, 274
  • Averroes’ Long Commentary on the De anima and his Commentary on Alexander’s De intellectu, 282
  • Summary, 295
  • Averroes’ Theories of Material Intellect as Reflected in Subsequent Jewish and Christian Thought, 298
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8. Averroes on the Active Intellect as the Cause of Human Thought, 315 – Alfarabi Avicenna and Averroes On Intellect

  • The Passage of the Human Intellect to Actuality, 315
  • The Possibility of Conjunction with the Active Intellect;
  • Immortality, 321
  • Prophecy, 340
  • Averroes’ Shifting Picture of the Universe and of Man’s Place in It, 351

ALFARABI AVICENNA AND AVERROES ON INTELLECT- Book Sample

GREEK AND ARABIC ANTECEDENTS  – Alfarabi Avicenna and Averroes On Intellect

Here I shall examine Greek and early Arabic speculation on the following topics: (1) the stages through which the human intellect can pass; (2) the type of entity the active intellect is; (3) the manner in which the active intellect produces human thought; (4) the active intellect’s role in bringing the sublunary world or segments of it into existence; and (5) the rationale that the active intellect furnishes for certain religious phenomena. My object will not be to reproduce the systems of the philosophers discussed but to draw attention to statements and theories that shed light on Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes.

ALFARABI AVICENNA AND AVERROES ON INTELLECT

As is hardly surprising, Aristotle constitutes the starting point for understanding Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes; certain post-Aristotelian Greek texts and early Arabic philosophic texts, nevertheless, also contributed to the setting in which they worked. The pertinent post-Aristotelian texts are: Alexander of Aphrodisias’ De anima [01]Aiexander, De anima, in Scrip/a minora 2.1, ed. I. Bruns (Berlin 1887) 1-100 ; a work entitled De intellectu, which is likewise attributed to Alexander,[02] Aiexander (?), De intellectu, in Scripta minora 2.1, 106-13. Arabic translation: Texte arabe du 1tept vou d’Alexandre d’Aphrodise, ed. … Continue reading although the attribution has been questioned because of discrepancies between the De intellectu and Alexander’s De anima[03]P. Moraux, Alexandre d’Aphrodise (Paris 1942) 132-42. Moraux later changed his mind and decided that both the De anima and De intellectu are … Continue reading; Plotinus’ Enneads[04]Plotinus, Enneades, ed. P. Henry and H.-R. Schwyzer 2 (Paris 1959) contains a useful English translation of the extant Arabic paraphrases of … Continue reading; Themistius’ Paraphrase of Aristotle’s De anima; Themistius’ Paraphrase of Aristotle’s

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References / Footnotes

01Aiexander, De anima, in Scrip/a minora 2.1, ed. I. Bruns (Berlin 1887) 1-100
02 Aiexander (?), De intellectu, in Scripta minora 2.1, 106-13. Arabic translation: Texte arabe du 1tept vou d’Alexandre d’Aphrodise, ed. J. Finnegan (Beirut 1956), with pagination of the Greek given; and Commentaires sur Aristote perdus en grec, ed. A. Badawi (Beirut 1968) 31-42. Neither edition of the Arabic version Is wholly adequate. I have translated from my own ad hoc eclectic text, which I base on both editions and their apparatuses, with corrections here and there from the Greek
03P. Moraux, Alexandre d’Aphrodise (Paris 1942) 132-42. Moraux later changed his mind and decided that both the De anima and De intellectu are genuine works of Alexander; see P. Moraux, “Le De anima dans la tradition grecque,” Aristotle on Mind and the Senses, ed. G. Lloyd and G. Owen (Cambridge 1975) 297,304.
04Plotinus, Enneades, ed. P. Henry and H.-R. Schwyzer 2 (Paris 1959) contains a useful English translation of the extant Arabic paraphrases of Plotinus, done by G. Lewis.